Educational Articles

  • Navicular 'disease' is really a group of related conditions affecting the navicular bone and associated structures in the foot. There are several possible causes of pain in and around the navicular bone.

  • Osteochondrosis (OCD) is a failure of the bone underlying the smooth articular cartilage inside the joints, i.e. the subchondral bone, to form properly from the skeleton's cartilage template.

  • Phenobarbital is used off label and given by mouth or as an injection to treat seizures or to sedate your pet. Common side effects include sleepiness, increased thirst, urination, and/or appetite. Do not use this medication in pets with liver, lung, or kidney disease or those that are allergic to barbiturates. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID, previously known as Equine Cushing's Disease) is a complex condition associated with abnormal function of a small, hormone-producing organ, the pituitary gland, that lies at the base of the brain.

  • Procainamide is used off label and given by mouth or injection to treat abnormal heart rhythms. Side effects may include loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, low blood pressure, less effective heart beats, and rhythm abnormalities. Do not use in Doberman Pinchers, Boxers, pets that are allergic to it or related drugs, or pets with myasthenia gravis, torsade de pointes, cardiac glycoside intoxication, or heart block. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Propranolol is given by mouth or injection and is used off-label to treat abnormal heart rhythms. Side effects are not common but may include lack of energy and diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or pets with heart block, heart failure, asthma, or a slow heart rate. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • The horse's hoof is a very complex structure. The tough outer wall surrounds layers of sensitive laminae ('leaves') that support, nourish with blood and, in turn, cover the underlying pedal bone.

  • Infection in the foot is by far, the most common cause of acute (sudden), single-leg lameness in the horse. Infection results in painful inflammation and pus (abscess) formation.

  • Quittor is an old term for a condition that involves death and destruction (necrosis) of the collateral cartilages of the foot (see our information sheet on sidebones), following an infection in the foot (see our information sheet on pus in the foot).

  • Ragwort is a tall plant with yellow flowers. Its scientific name is Senecio jacobea and it contains a poison (toxin) that is also found in some other plants, such as Lantana and some Heliotropes.